June Challenge #2 - Donate Body to Anatomy Department

While working for the BBC, I filmed in the dissection room at Dundee University.

The boss, Professor Dame Sue Black, wanted to go on television to appeal for more people to leave their bodies to anatomy departments.

The doctors, anatomists, surgeons (and more) of tomorrow learn most from human cadavers.

We expressly did not record pictures of bodies.  We focused on the students doing their work.

It made a big impression on me,and I must have spoken about it quite a lot because, years later, I discovered it made an equal impression on Liz.  In particular, I was impressed by the respect shown to the ex-humans, for whom they hold a group memorial service to which relatives are invited.  Students almost always attend too.

I've always carried a donor card.  When I die, the nearest transplant team can have first call on any organs.  But as I approach my 60th birthday I have to be realistic - they might not want my bits!

However, my body and that of Liz, might still help someone learn a little more about what goes on inside a human.  So six months ago, I telephoned the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification at Dundee and asked to be sent two sets of bequest forms.

Then we paused.  This is not something to rush.  On and off, Liz and I talked about it, during drives, over dinner, whenever.  Then we read a book.

All That Remains is written by Sue Black and is an absolutely fabulous book.  It's about death, based on which Professor Black has made a fascinating career.  Few people have been on such nodding terms with the grim reaper.

Her book answered many of our outstanding questions and more we hadn't even considered.  For example, we know for sure we wouldn't want to be part of the USA style 'fresh/frozen' approach, where universities can order 4 legs and a couple of arms.  Where's the dignity in that?

Since I filmed at Dundee, the centre has pioneered a new form of preserving a cadaver that makes the flesh more realistic.  The old approach, preserving in formalin, left the bodies looking and feeling like air-dried tuna.  The new method is the one we would prefer.

So Liz and I signed the forms with witnesses and sent them back.  I also dropped a line to Professor Sue Black to explain this background and to thank her for writing such a good book.

Oh, and to hope it's a long, long time before I meet her students again.

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